Ghandi’s Top 10 —

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Seeking an independent India, during its British-ruled era (between 1858 and 1947), Mahatma Gandhi led movements of nonviolent civil disobedience, inspiring for civil rights and freedom throughout the world. His birthday, October 2nd, is now celebrated, worldwide, as the “International Day of Nonviolence.”

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How Do You Hear / Who Do You See?

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I hate when people talk over each other. Like the louder they speak, they better chance they’ll be heard. It is [to mention first] harder than hell to hear both of you vocalizing at the same time, and talking louder really does not help. It shows that a person is too impatient to wait for their peer to finish speaking, and instead feels that they have something more important to say. It shows clearly that they are not digesting what the other person is saying, because they have recalled a story about their own lives that is just as relevant. Why must we always be thinking of ourselves? What makes us more  important that we must be heard over the others? In most cases, we can take a lesson away from the things that other people talk about. It is good to practice being open-minded and accepting  of what the universe is presenting to you, and to not always be thinking of our own situations and “developments.” Let us (please) not talk over someone who is talking, or telling us a story. Out of respect, let them finish what they’ve thought to say… We are not as important as we think we are. Realize this. Our stories/complaints/views matter no more than anyone else’s. And the bottom line of this tangent: listen to what other people are telling you. For all you know, it could be the words you need to hear for a better understanding of something in your own life. And besides, how can we learn anything if all that we choose to see is ourselves?

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© 2013 by Stephanie Himmelman. All Rights Reserved

No part of my writing may be reproduced, published, distributed, copied or displayed.

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