How to Remember Your Dreams

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“I didn’t have a dream last night.”

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Have you ever said this? Well… it’s not true.

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Dreaming occurs during our rapid eye movement (REM) cycle of sleep and, based on an eight hour night of rest, the average person will cycle through REM between four and five times. With each REM cycle lasting approximately 20 minutes, we will experience 100(+) minutes of “dream” time per night!  So, you may have heard it said before: we dream every single night. No matter if we remember our dreams or not? Well, that is the truth. During our sleep, a dream will last anywhere between 30 seconds and 45 minutes. And the dream world we enter into is exciting and adventurous…

if we can actually remember our visit when we awake from it…

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To remember your dreams, try these mental techniques just before bed:

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1)       If you’re having trouble recalling your dreams in the morning, awareness is your first step. Having the desire to remember your dreams, and looking into methods that help you do so, will aid in your recollection of dreams.

2)      Hold yourself to a regular sleep schedule. It is important that you lay your body to rest and awake from it around the same times every day. Then your body will know when to expect a solid night’s rest.

3)      As you lay in bed, clear your mind of everything rattling within it. The stresses of the day, the worries of tomorrow, and the anxieties of your discomfort… Forget it all. When your head hits that comfortable pillow, just focus on clearing your mind entirely.

4)      Tell yourself, “When I wake up, I will remember my dream.” (Yep. Believe it or not, this is a proven and effective technique—Maybe it’s mind power, but I’ve tried this and it has worked!)

5)      Recreational drug and alcohol use alter your REM sleep cycles, which will inhibit your amount of dreamtime. Also, consuming foods that are high in fats before bed will hinder the ability to recollect your dreams.  Sooo… If ya wanna experience the excitement of dreamland, cut out those unhealthy pastimes!

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When you wake up from a dream, you can still feel the emotions and the presence of it. The faces, the settings, the scenarios, the moods… Sometimes, you might even wake up crying! (or more of a whimper, if you’re like me). Dreams are like living real life in an unreal [and limitless] world. A world where we can do anything. When we snap from sleep and can recall what we just dreamed, the memory of it seems strong. But slowly, as we wake up and the morning begins, the memory of our dream fades. Have you realized this? You can recall your dream so easily after emerging from it, but you lose the pieces as your mind collects its morning clutter.

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To remember your dreams, try these short tips immediately after waking from sleep:

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1)       Don’t move. The more you move, the more you brain perceives minute details of the waking world. Lie still. Think to yourself about everything you just dreamed. Say it out loud, even. Anything that will help you remember.

2)      Feel the emotions you had. Remember the atmosphere. Were you upset? Filled with joy? Absolutely terrified? Keep these feelings collected within your memory. Recall what events made you feel this way…

3)      If you prefer, have a pencil  near your bed and notepad that you can jot your dream into. Wake up, turn on the lamp at your bedside, and write down your experiences. Sketch any symbols you’ve seen in your visions, and other drawings that you feel necessary. As we all know, it is easiest to recall our dreams as soon as we have woken from them. And consistently drafting in a “dream journal” will give you reference to documentation of dreams in your past.

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Tonight and just after waking, practice these simple methods of dream recollection. You’ll be surprised to realize how well your mind will cooperate. You’ll recall the images and emotions of your dream world, or better— you’ll realize while you are there! But lucid dreaming is a whole separate story…

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So get some sleep tonight, then wake up and give me your feedback!

OR

submit the events of your dream for peer analysis on the Open for Interpretation page.

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© 2013 by Stephanie Himmelman. All Rights Reserved.

No part of my writing may be reproduced, published, distributed, copied or displayed

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. How to Remember Your Dreams… | HIMMELMAN MANUSCRIPT
    Apr 10, 2013 @ 22:02:55

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